By William Howell (sometimes spelled Howel)

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Even though Charleston was a port town, its seaboard location does not seem to have been the primary influence on either its regional or its colonial role. As its occupational structure shows, the town had developed in significant ways beyond its mercantile and agricultural functions. In particular, the profile of the business community bore a strong similarity to the British provincial leisure town: a type of urban place that was increasingly being pushed to the fore by new consumption patterns among local elites, and by new manufacturing trends in Britain’s regions.

McKendrick, “Josiah Wedgwood: An Eighteenth-Century Entrepreneur in Salesmanship and Marketing Techniques,” Economic History Review 12 (1959– 1960); Pat Hudson, The Genesis of Industrial Capital: A Study of the West Riding Wool Textile Industry c 1750–1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986); Maxine Berg, “Women’s Work, Mechanization and the Early Phases of the Industrialization in England,” in The Historical Meanings of Work, ed. Patrick Joyce (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987); “Small Producer Capitalism in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” Business History 35, 1 (1993).

N. McKendrick, “Josiah Wedgwood: An Eighteenth-Century Entrepreneur in Salesmanship and Marketing Techniques,” Economic History Review 12 (1959– 1960); Pat Hudson, The Genesis of Industrial Capital: A Study of the West Riding Wool Textile Industry c 1750–1850 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986); Maxine Berg, “Women’s Work, Mechanization and the Early Phases of the Industrialization in England,” in The Historical Meanings of Work, ed. Patrick Joyce (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987); “Small Producer Capitalism in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” Business History 35, 1 (1993).

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